Civil War

Newspaper Articles

No. 2

WRITTEN BY:
Charles E. Bunnell
9318 Fairway Ct
La Plata, MD 20646

Source: This information was contibuted by Charles E. Bunnell, the owner of the original receipt.

Copyright 1997 Charles E. Bunnell

Material may be freely used by non-commercial entities, as long as this full paragraph remains on all copied material. These electronic pages, with original information, commentary, and underlying source code, cannot be reproduced in any format for profit or other presentation, nor may this copyrighted original electronic text be used on any other site or CD-ROM.

The Bunnell Newspaper Clippings

SRC NO. N2

NEWSPAPER: : Unknown; possibly Whitney Point NY Reporter
DATE: Circa 1940 to 1946
AUTHOR: Herman E. Bunnell
PHOTOCOPY WITH COMPILER

THE SPIRIT OF '76
East Berkshire Man Tells Interesting Incidents of Civil War Days

The lad, for he was but a stripling though he has seen hard service, lay stretched out on the seat of the car. Another lad of less than 20 summers with an arm in a sling came and took a seat behind him. He gazed upon him with mournful interest. Looking up to me, for I was accompanying the sick boy to his home, he asked, "Is he a soldier?"
"Yes."
"Of what regiment?"
"The 13th Illinois cavalry. Are you a soldier?"
"Yes."
"Where do you belong?"
"In the 105th Illinois volunteers."
"The 105th regiment that sounds, well, Illinois is doing nobly."
"I did belong to the 11th Illinois infantry."
"Then how come you were in the 105th?"
"I was wounded at the battle of Fort Donaldson so that I was pronounced unfit for service and discharged. But I recovered from my wound and when they commenced raising this regiment in my neighbor[hood] I enlisted again." ---herto the sick boy had been ---etly still. Now he slowly turned over, looked up with glistening eyes, stretched forth his hand with slow movement of a sick man to the top of the seat and without saying a word grasped the hand of the new recruit. The patriotism that glowed in those wan features and prompted those slow, tremulous movements ran like electricity through every heart. The twice-enlisted youth, as soon as he saw his intention, delighted at the appreciation and reflection of his own spirit, grasped the outstretched hand and exclaimed, "Bully for you." Words cannot describe the effect upon those passengers as they saw those hands clasp in mutual esteem for love of country, a mutual pledge that each was ready to give his life, his all for that country. They felt that the spirit of '76 still survived. These two were in Frank Leslie's paper of Oct. 25, 1862. An enrolling marshall stopped at a lady's house who was trying to effect a 20% abatement on a peck of potatoes.
He asked, "Have you any men here?"
The reply was gruff and curt. "No."
"Have you no husband?"
"No."
"Nor brothers?"
"No."
"Perhaps you have a son?"
"Well, what of it?"
"I should like to know where he is."
"Well, he is not here."
"So I see, Mam."
"Pray, where is he?"
"In the Union Army where you ought to be."
The marshall hurried around the corner and did not further interrogate the lady. H. Alexande, the color bearer of the 10th New York regiment deserves to be placed high on the roll of our heroes. He received three terrible wounds in a recent engagement but clung to the colors with tenacious grasp. While being taken into the hospital he became unconscious and an attempt was made to take away the flag but the unconscious hand held it more powerfully than when his ruling passion was strong. Such men in life or death are glorious examples. Oct. 4, 1862, when Gen. Reno fell on the battle field Gen. Sturgis was within a few yards of him. Those generals were bosom friends, had been classmates at West Point and graduated together. When Reno fell Sturgis ran to his assistance and had him picked up and said, "Are you badly wounded Jessie?" To which he replied, "Yes, Sam I am a dead man." Sturgis had him placed on a litter and carried to the rear where he died in an hour. His last words before leaving the battle field were, "Boys I can be with you no longer in body but I am with you in spirit."

H. E. BUNNELL
East Berkshire, N. Y.


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This page was updated Wednesday, 26-Mar-2008 06:35:48 PDT.